EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION
COLLECTION OF 2021 EEO-1 COMPONENT 1 DATA

STANDARD FORM 100, Employer Information Report (EEO-1)
INSTRUCTION BOOKLET

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION
COLLECTION OF 2021 EEO-1 COMPONENT 1 DATA
STANDARD FORM 100, Employer Information Report (EEO-1)
INSTRUCTION BOOKLET

The Employer Information Report (EEO-1 Component 1) (EEO-1 Report), Standard Form 100, is collected annually under the authority of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000e, et. seq., as amended (Title VII). All employers with 15 or more employees are covered by Title VII and are required to keep employment records as specified by Commission regulations. Based on the number of employees and federal contract activities, certain employers are required to file an EEO-1 Component 1 Report on an annual basis under the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) regulations. State and local governments, public school systems, educational institutions, and local referral unions are covered by other employment reports and are excluded from the Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100.

In the interests of consistency, uniformity and economy, Standard Form 100 has been jointly developed by the EEOC and OFCCP, as a single form which meets the statistical needs of both programs. As stated above, the filing of the Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100, is required by law; it is not voluntary. Under Section 709(c) of Title VII, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission may compel an employer to file this form by obtaining an order from the United States District Court. Under Section 209(a) of Executive Order 11246, the penalties for failure by a federal contractor or subcontractor to comply may include termination of the federal government contract and debarment from future federal contracts.

Summary Information

 

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1. Who Must File?

The Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100, Component 1, must be filed by:

  1. All private employers2 who are:

    1. (1) subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, with 100 or more employees EXCLUDING State and local governments, public primary and secondary school systems, institutions of higher education, American Indian or Alaska Native tribes, and tax-exempt private membership clubs other than labor organizations;
    2. -- OR --
    3. (2) subject to Title VII who have fewer than 100 employees if the company is owned or affiliated with another company, or there is centralized ownership, control or management (such as central control of personnel policies and labor relations) so that the group legally constitutes a single enterprise and the entire enterprise employs a total of 100 or more employees.
  2. All federal contractors3 who:

    1. (1) are not exempt as provided for by 41 CFR 60-1.5;
    2. (2) have 50 or more employees;
    3. (3) are prime contractors4 or first tier subcontractors;
    4. -- AND --
    5. (4) have a contract, subcontract, or purchase order amounting to $50,000 or more; or serve as depositories of Government funds in any amount; or are financial institutions which are issuing and paying agents for U.S. Savings Bonds and savings notes.

Establishments located in the District of Columbia and the 50 states are required to submit Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100. No reports should be filed for establishments in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, or other American Protectorates.


2Appendix A of this document outlines the definition of an employer for the purposes of filing the Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100.

3Appendix B of this document outlines the federal contractors subject to executive order 11246 and required to file Employer Information Report (EEO-1) Standard Form 100.

4Appendix C of this document outlines the responsibilities of prime contractors for the purposes of filing the Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100.

2. Legal Basis

The Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100, must be filed by all employers identified in Section 1 of this Instruction Booklet. Appendix F outlines the legal basis for the EEO-1 Component 1 data collection.

3. When To File

The 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 data collection is tentatively scheduled to open on Tuesday, April 12th, 2022. The tentative deadline to file the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 Report is Tuesday, May 17th, 2022. The final opening and deadline dates will be posted on the EEOC’s dedicated website for its EEO-1 Component 1 data collection at www.eeocdata.org/eeo1 and on the EEOC’s public website at www.eeoc.gov/employers/eeo-data-collections.

4. How To File

The EEOC requires that EEO-1 Component 1 Reports be submitted electronically via the EEO-1 Component 1 Online Filing System (OFS), accessible at www.eeocdata.org/eeo1. Returning filers will be required to reset their password when logging in. New filers must first register in the OFS using a company ID and PIN. Once registered, workforce demographic data (i.e., employee race/ethnicity and sex data by job category) can be entered directly into the online application or submitted as an electronically uploaded data file.

A. SINGLE-ESTABLISHMENT EMPLOYERS

A single-establishment employer (i.e., an employer conducting business at only one establishment) is required to submit only one EEO-1 Component 1 Report.

Type 1 Single-Establishment Report (Type 1 Report): An employer conducting business at only one establishment is permitted to complete and submit one EEO-1 Component 1 Report (i.e., Single-Establishment Report, or “Type 1 Report”). The Type 1 Report must include demographic data for all the employer’s employees categorized by race/ethnicity, sex, and job category.

B. MULTI-ESTABLISHMENT EMPLOYERS

A multi-establishment employer (i.e., an employer conducting business at more than one establishment) is required to submit all the following types of reports:5

Type 2 Consolidated Report (Type 2 Report): All multi-establishment employers must submit a Type 2 Consolidated Report. The Type 2 Report must include demographic data for all employees of the employer (i.e., all employees at headquarters as well as all establishments) categorized by race/ethnicity, sex, and job category. In other words, the total number of employees indicated on the Type 3 Headquarters Report, PLUS the applicable establishment reports (i.e., Type 4 Establishment and/or Type 8 Establishment Reports) MUST equal the total number of employees shown on the Type 2 Consolidated Report. For the purposes of this report, the term parent corporation refers to any corporation which owns all or the majority stock of another corporation so that the latter relates to it as a subsidiary.

Type 3 Headquarters Report (Type 3 Report): All multi-establishment employers must submit a Type 3 Headquarters Report. The Type 3 Headquarters Report must include demographic data for all employees working at the main office site (i.e., headquarters) of the employer, as well as any remote employees who report to the employer’s headquarters categorized by race/ethnicity, sex, and job category. A Type 3 Report must be submitted even if there are fewer than 50 employees working at and/or reporting to the headquarters location.

Type 4 Establishment Report (Type 4 Report): All multi-establishment employers with establishments with 50 or more employees must submit a Type 4 Establishment Report(s). A Type 4 Report must be submitted for each establishment with 50 or more employees. The Type 4 Report must include employee demographic data for each establishment categorized by race/ethnicity, sex, and job category.

Type 8 Establishment Report (Type 8 Report): All multi-establishment employers with establishments with fewer than 50 employees must submit a Type 8 Establishment Report(s). A Type 8 Report must be submitted for each establishment with fewer than 50 employees. The Type 8 Report must include employee demographic data for each establishment categorized by race/ethnicity, sex, and job category.

Discontinuation of the Type 6 Establishment List Report

On January 6, 2022, the EEOC posted an announcement on the dedicated EEO-1 Component 1 home page at https://www.eeocdata.org/eeo1 notifying employers that the agency is discontinuing the EEO-1 Component 1 Type 6 Establishment List Report (“Type 6 Report”) for reporting establishments with fewer than 50 employees. Beginning with the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 data collection, ALL filers reporting data for establishments with fewer than 50 employees must use a Type 8 Establishment Report (“Type 8 Report”) to submit such data. This change will allow the EEOC to collect more accurate employee demographic data in support of the agency’s mission to prevent and remedy unlawful employment discrimination and advance equal opportunity for all in the workplace.

For the 2019 and 2020 EEO-1 Component 1 data collections (which are now closed), the EEOC only permitted filers who had previously submitted a Type 6 Report to do so. All filers who were permitted to submit a Type 6 Report for the 2019/2020 collections were notified via email on January 6, 2022, regarding the discontinuation of the Type 6 Report so these filers may prepare for the opening of the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 filing using Type 8 Reports.


5Employment data for multi-establishment employers, including parent corporations and their subsidiary holdings, must report all employees working at each establishment(s) and subsidiary establishment(s)

5. Requests For Information And Special Procedures

Pursuant to 29 CFR § 1602.10, if an employer claims that the preparation or filing of the report would create undue hardship, the employer may apply to the Commission for an exemption. Employers must submit requests in writing to the Commission. Requests for special reporting procedures or alternative reporting under 29 CFR § 1602.10 should also be submitted to the Commission in writing. Requests under 29 CFR § 1602.10 should be submitted to the Commission prior to the filing deadline for the report. For the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 data collection, the filing deadline is Tuesday, May 17, 2022

All requests must be submitted in writing and sent to the following mailing address:

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Attn: Office of Enterprise Data and Analytics (OEDA)
131 M Street NE
Washington, DC 20507

6. Confidentiality

All reports and any information from individual reports are subject to the confidentiality provisions of Section 709(e) of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e-8(e), as amended (Title VII) and may not be made public by the EEOC prior to the institution of any proceeding under Title VII involving the EEO-1 Component 1 data. Any EEOC employee who violates this prohibition may be found guilty of a criminal misdemeanor and could be fined or imprisoned. The confidentiality requirements allow the EEOC to publish only aggregated data, and only in a manner that does not identify any particular filer or reveal any individual employee’s personal information.

7. Burden Estimate

Comments regarding this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing burden, can be sent at any time to:

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Attn: Office of Enterprise Data and Analytics (OEDA)
131 M Street NE
Washington, DC 20507

OR

Paperwork Reduction Act (3046-0049)
Office of Management and Budget
Washington, DC 20503

8. 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 Filing Process

As part of the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 filing process, employers will be asked to provide certain details as they work through the EEO-1 Component 1 Online Filing System (OFS). Detailed information on how to file, including screenshots, are available in the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 User’s Guide.

A. CONFIRM COMPANY & CONTACTS

Contact Information

Confirms (returning filers) or collects (new filers) details about company contacts, including a primary contact and certifying official.

Company Information

Confirms (returning filers) or collects (new filers) details about the company, including Employer Identification Number (EIN), NAICS code, company name, and headquarters address.

Eligibility Determination

Companies that answer yes to the below questions are required to file the EEO-1 Component 1 Report annually. The 2021 pay period used for reporting is an employer-selected pay period between October 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021:

  1. During the 2021 pay period used for reporting, did the entire company have 100 or more employees?
  2. During the 2021 pay period used for reporting, was the company affiliated through common ownership and/or centralized management with other entities in an enterprise with a total employment of 100 or more employees?
  3. During the 2021 pay period used for reporting, did the company or any of its establishments: (1) have 50 or more employees; (2) was not exempt as provided for by 41 CFR 60-1.5; (3) was a prime contractor or first-tier subcontractor; AND (4) have a contract, subcontract, or purchase order amounting to $50,000 or more; or served as a depository of Government funds in any amount; or was a financial institution which was an issuing and paying agent for U.S. Savings Bonds and savings notes?

B. FILE/UPLOAD EEO-1 COMPONENT 1 REPORTS

Eligible employers will be required to confirm, update, and/or enter establishment information (if applicable), workforce snapshot pay period(s), and workforce demographic data by race/ethnicity, sex, and job category.

Establishment Information

Employers will be able to confirm, update, or enter establishment information6 via the EEO-1 Component 1 Online Filing System (OFS). This establishment information includes the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code describing the major business activity or services being performed. The major activity of each establishment should be sufficiently descriptive to identify the industry and product produced or service provided. If an establishment is engaged in more than one activity, describe the activity at which the greatest number of employees work. To identify the correct NAICS code for each establishment, you can search the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Industry Lookup Tool (https://data.bls.gov/cew/apps/bls_naics/v2/bls_naics_app.htm) or the NAICS industry look-up site (https://www.naics.com/search/). Please note that employers should use 2017 NAICS codes for the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 data collection.

The description of the major activity indicated on the Type 3 Headquarters Report (Type 3 Report) must reflect the dominant economic activity of the company in which the greatest numbers of employees are engaged.

Workforce Snapshot Pay Period

Workforce demographic data (i.e., employee race/ethnicity and sex data by job category) must include all full-time and part-time employees, except those employees specifically excluded as indicated in the Appendix A, who were employed during the pay period selected by the employer between October 1st and December 31st of the reporting year (i.e., the “workforce snapshot pay period”). Employees must be counted by sex and race/ethnicity within the 10 specified job categories. The workforce snapshot pay period for the 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 Report would be an employer-selected pay period between October 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021.

Workforce Demographic Data

Workforce demographic data (i.e., employee race/ethnicity and sex data by job category) can be provided by (1) directly entering the data into the EEO-1 Component 1 Online Filing System (OFS), or (2) uploading a data file using the approved 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 Data File Upload template.

Employers must report total employees in the workforce snapshot pay period for each category of race/ethnicity, sex, and job category. Each employee must be counted in only one of the race/ethnicity, sex and job category classifications from Appendix D (i.e., an employee should not be listed more than once in the EEO-1 Component 1 Report).

To simplify and standardize the method of reporting, all jobs are considered to belong to one of the 10 broad job categories shown in the EEO-1 Component 1 Report. A description of the EEO-1 Component 1 job categories can be found in Appendix E of this document. You can also find information on the most recent Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system codes and a crosswalk between the older and newer versions of the SOC codes on the Census Bureau website at https://www.census.gov/topics/employment/industry-occupation/guidance/code-lists.html

Additionally, the total reported employees within each job category should equal the sum of each employee reported for that job category across all race/ethnicity and sex categories. Further, the total number employees within a particular race/ethnicity and sex category should equal the sum of that group across all job categories.

Remarks

After entering workforce demographic data, employers are invited to provide any remarks, explanations, or other pertinent information regarding the report.

C. REVIEW EEO-1 COMPONENT 1 REPORTS

After submitting EEO-1 Component 1 reports, employers may preview uncertified PDF reports for each establishment location prior to certifying their submission.

D. CERTIFY EEO-1 COMPONENT 1 REPORTS

The final stage in the EEO-1 Component 1 filing process is the report certification process.

Comments

Employers may include in this section any additional comments or remarks regarding their 2021 EEO-1 Component 1 filing.

Certification

Once the employer’s reports have been completed, the name and contact information for the Certifying Official and the person at the employer to contact regarding the report should be entered. The Certifying Official must check the box on the screen certifying that all statements are accurate and were prepared in accordance with the instructions.


6Appendix A of this document outlines the definition of an establishment for the purposes of filing the Employer Information Report (EEO-1), Standard Form 100 Component 1.

Appendix A. Definitions Applicable to All Employers

 

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a. "Commission"

Refers to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

b. "OFCCP"

Refers to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, U.S. Department of Labor, established to implement Executive Order 11246, as amended.

c. "Employer"

Under Section 701(b), Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Means a person engaged in an industry affecting commerce who has 15 or more employees for each working day in each of 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year, and any agent of such a person, but such term does not include the United States, a corporation wholly owned by the government of the United States, American Indian or Alaska Native tribes, or any department or agency of the District of Columbia subject by statute to procedures of the competitive service (as defined in section 2102 of Title 5 of the United States Code), or a bona fide private membership club (other than a labor organization) which is exempt from taxation under Section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954;

OR any person or entity subject to Executive Order 11246 who is a federal government prime contractor or subcontractor at any tier (including a bank or other establishment serving as a depository of federal government funds, or an issuing and paying agent of U.S. Savings Bonds and savings notes, or a holder of a federal government bill of lading) or a federally-assisted construction prime contractor or subcontractor at any tier.

d. "Employee"

Means any individual on the payroll of an employer who is an employee for purposes of the employers withholding of Social Security taxes except insurance sales agents who are considered to be employees for such purposes solely because of the provisions of 26 USC 3121 (d)(3)(B) (the Internal Revenue Code). Leased employees are included in this definition.

e. "Leased Employee"

For EEO-1 Component 1 reporting only, means a permanent employee provided by an employment agency for a fee to an outside company for which the employment agency handles all personnel tasks including payroll, staffing, benefit payments and compliance reporting. The employment agency shall include leased employees in its EEO-1 report.

For EEO-1 Component 1 reporting purposes only, the term “employee” shall not include persons who are hired on a casual basis for a specified time, or for the duration of a specified job (for example, a person at a construction site whose employment relationship is expected to terminate with the end of the employee’s work at the site); persons temporarily employed in any industry other than construction, such as temporary office workers, mariners, stevedores, lumber yard workers, etc., who are hired through a hiring hall or other referral arrangement, through an employee contractor or agent, or by some individual hiring arrangement, or persons (EXCEPT leased employees) on the payroll of an employment agency who are referred by such agency for work to be performed on the premises of another employer under that employers direction and control. These definitions are only for purposes of clarifying who reports these individuals on the EEO-1 Component 1 and do not have legal ramifications as to the analysis of whether a particular individual is an employee or an independent contractor. That is done under the factors enumerated by the Supreme Court in Nationwide Mutual Ins. Co. v. Darden, 503 U.S. 318 (1992).

f. "Commerce"

Means trade, traffic, commerce, transportation, transmission, or communication among the several States; or between a State and any place outside thereof; or within the District of Columbia, or a possession of the United States; or between points in the same State but through a point outside thereof.

g. "Industry Affecting Commerce"

Means any activity, business or industry in commerce or in which a labor dispute would hinder or obstruct commerce or the free flow of commerce and includes any activity or industry affecting commerce within the meaning of the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959. Any employer of 15 or more persons is presumed to be in an industry affecting commerce.

h. "Establishment"

Is generally a single physical location where business is conducted or where services or industrial operations are performed (e.g., factory, mill, store, hotel, movie theater, mine, farm, airline terminal, sales office, warehouse, or central administrative office (definition adapted from the North American Industry Classification System, 2012). Units at different physical locations, even though engaged in the same kind of business operation, must be reported as separate establishments. For locations involving construction, transportation, communications, electric, gas, and sanitary services, oil and gas fields, and similar types of physically dispersed industrial activities, however, it is not necessary to list separately each individual site, project, field, line, etc., unless it is treated by you as a separate legal entity. For these types of activities, list as establishments only those relatively permanent main or branch offices, terminals, stations etc., which are either: (a) directly responsible for supervising such dispersed activities (where employees work from home, they should be reported as if working at the establishment where their supervisor is reported to work); or (b) the base from which personnel and equipment operate to carry out these activities. (Where these dispersed activities cross State lines, at least one such establishment should be listed for each State involved.)

i. "Major Activity"

Means the major product or group of products produced or handled, or services rendered by the reporting unit (e.g., manufacturing airplane parts, retail sales of office furniture) in terms of the activity at which the greatest number of all employees work. The description includes the type of product manufactured or sold or the type of service provided. “Major Activity” is based on the industrial definitions developed by the federal government as adopted by the EEOC (For example, the North American Industry Classification System, 2017).

It is the opinion of the Commission that Section 702 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, does not authorize a complete exemption of religious organizations from the coverage of the Act or of the reporting requirements of the Commission. The exemption for religious organizations applies to their employment of individuals of a particular religion to perform work connected with the organization’s activities. Therefore, since the Standard Form 100 does not provide for information as to the religion of employees, religious organizations must report all information required by this report.

Appendix B. Definitions Applicable Only to Government Contractors Subject to Executive Order 11246

 

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a. "Order"

Means Executive Order 11246, as amended.

b. "Contract"

Means any government contract or any federally-assisted construction contract.

c. "Prime Contractor"

Means any employer having a government contract or any federally- assisted construction contract, or any employer serving as a depository of federal government funds.

d. "Subcontractor"

Means any employer having a contract with a prime contractor or another subcontractor calling for supplies or services required for the performance of a government contract or federally assisted construction contract.

e. "Contracting Agency"

Means any department, agency and establishment in the executive branch of the government, including any wholly-owned government corporation, which enters into contracts.

f. "Administering Agency"

Means any department, agency and establishment in the executive branch of the government, including any wholly-owned government corporation, which administers a program involving federally-assisted construction contracts.

Appendix C. Responsibilities of Prime Contractors

  1. At the time of an award of a subcontract subject to these reporting requirements, the prime contractor shall inform the subcontractor of its responsibility to submit annual EEO-1 Component 1 employment data in accordance with these instructions.
  2. If prime contractors are required by their Contracting Officer or subcontractors by their prime contractors, to submit notification of filing, they shall do so by ordinary correspondence. However, such notification is not required by and should not be sent to the EEOC.

Appendix D. Race, Ethnicity, and Sex Identification

 

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Overview

Self-identification is the preferred method of identifying the race and ethnicity information necessary for the EEO-1 Component 1 report. Employers are required to attempt to allow employees to use self-identification to complete the EEO-1 Component 1 report.

As to the method of collecting data, the basic principles for ethnic and racial self-identification for purposes of the EEO-1 report are:

  1. Offer employees the opportunity to self-identify.
  2. Provide a statement about the voluntary nature of this inquiry for employees. For example, language such as the following may be used (employers may adapt this language):

    "The employer is subject to certain governmental recordkeeping and reporting requirements for the administration of civil rights laws and regulations. In order to comply with these laws, the employer invites employees to voluntarily self-identify their race or ethnicity. Submission of this information is voluntary and refusal to provide it will not subject you to any adverse treatment. The information obtained will be kept confidential and may only be used in accordance with the provisions of applicable laws, executive orders, and regulations, including those that require the information to be summarized and reported to the federal government for civil rights enforcement. When reported, data will not identify any specific individual."
If an employee declines to self-identify his or her race and/or ethnicity, employment records or observer identification may be used. Where records are maintained, it is recommended that they be kept separately from the employee’s basic personnel file or other records available to those responsible for personnel decisions.

Race and ethnicity designations as used by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for the EEO-1 Component 1 do not denote scientific definitions of anthropological origins. In addition, such designations do not control who is protected by Title VII’s prohibitions against employment discrimination based on race or national origin.

Definitions of the EEO-1 race and ethnicity categories are as follows:

Hispanic or Latino - A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin regardless of race.

White - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Black or African American - A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander - A person having origins in any of the peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

Asian - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian Subcontinent, including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

American Indian or Alaska Native - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintain tribal affiliation or community attachment.

Two or More Races - All persons who identify with more than one of the above five races (White, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, Asian, American Indian or Alaska Native). For the purposes of this group, identifying as Hispanic or Latino and only one of the listed 5 race groups does NOT qualify.

Instructions for assigning employees into the race/ethnicity categories:

Hispanic or Latino - Include all employees who answer “YES” to the question, “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” in the appropriate category for both males and females as indicated.

White (Not Hispanic or Latino) - Include all employees who identify as White and no other race, and who did not answer “YES” to the question “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” for both males and females as indicated in the appropriate category.

Black or African American (Not Hispanic or Latino)- Include all employees who identify as Black or African American and no other race, and who did not answer “YES” to the question “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” for both males and females as indicated in the appropriate category.

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Not Hispanic or Latino) - Include all employees who identify as Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander and no other race, and who did not answer “YES” to the question “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” for both males and females as indicated in the appropriate category.

Asian (Not Hispanic or Latino) - Include all employees who identify as Asian and no other race, and who did not answer “YES” to the question “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” for both males and females as indicated in the appropriate category.

American Indian or Alaska Native (Not Hispanic or Latino) - Include all employees who identify as American Indian or Alaska Native and no other race, and who did not answer “YES” to the question “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” for both males and females as indicated in the appropriate category.

Two or More Races (Not Hispanic or Latino) - Include all employees who identify with more than one of the above five races, and who did not answer “YES” to the question “Are you Hispanic or Latino?” for both males and females as indicated in the appropriate category.

Appendix E. Description of Job Categories

 

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Overview

The major job categories are listed below, including a brief description of the skills and training required for occupations in that category and examples of the job titles that fit each category. The examples shown below are illustrative and not intended to be exhaustive of all job titles in a job category. These job categories are primarily based on the average skill level, knowledge, and responsibility involved in each occupation within the job category.

The "Officials and Managers" category as a whole is to be divided into the following two subcategories: "Executive/Senior Level Officials and Managers," and "First/Mid-Level" Officials and Managers. These subcategories are intended to mirror the employers own well established hierarchy of management positions. Small employers who may not have two well-defined hierarchical steps of management should report their management employees in the appropriate categories.

Executive/Senior Level Officials and Managers

Individuals who plan, direct and formulate policies, set strategy and provide the overall direction of enterprises/organizations for the development and delivery of products or services, within the parameters approved by boards of directors or other governing bodies. Residing in the highest levels of organizations, these executives plan, direct or coordinate activities with the support of subordinate executives and staff managers. They include, in larger organizations, those individuals within two reporting levels of the CEO, whose responsibilities require frequent interaction with the CEO. Examples of these kinds of managers are: chief executive officers, chief operating officers, chief financial officers, line of business heads, presidents or executive vice presidents of functional areas or operating groups, chief information officers, chief human resources officers, chief marketing officers, chief legal officers, management directors and managing partners.

First/Mid-Level Officials and Managers

Individuals who serve as managers, other than those who serve as Executive/Senior Level Officials and Managers, including those who oversee and direct the delivery of products, services or functions at group, regional or divisional levels of organizations. These managers receive directions from the Executive/Senior Level management and typically lead major business units. They implement policies, programs and directives of executive/senior management through subordinate managers and within the parameters set by Executive/Senior Level management. Examples of these kinds of managers are: vice presidents and directors, group, regional or divisional controllers; treasurers; human resources, information systems, marketing, and operations managers. The “First/Mid-Level Officials and Managers” subcategory also includes those who report directly to middle managers. These individuals serve at functional, line of business segment or branch levels and are responsible for directing and executing the day-to-day operational objectives of enterprises/organizations, conveying the directions of higher level officials and managers to subordinate personnel and, in some instances, directly supervising the activities of exempt and non-exempt personnel. Examples of these kinds of managers are: first-line managers; team managers; unit managers; operations and production mangers; branch managers; administrative services managers; purchasing and transportation managers; storage and distribution managers; call center or customer service managers; technical support managers; and brand or product managers.

Professionals

Most jobs in this category require bachelor and graduate degrees, and/or professional certification. In some instances, comparable experience may establish a person's qualifications. Examples of these kinds of positions include: accountants and auditors; airplane pilots and flight engineers; architects; artists; chemists; computer programmers; designers; dieticians; editors; engineers; lawyers; librarians; mathematical scientists; natural scientists; registered nurses; physical scientists; physicians and surgeons; social scientists; teachers; and surveyors.

Technicians

Jobs in this category include activities that require applied scientific skills, usually obtained by post-secondary education of varying lengths, depending on the particular occupation, recognizing that in some instances additional training, certification, or comparable experience is required. Examples of these types of positions include: drafters; emergency medical technicians; chemical technicians; and broadcast and sound engineering technicians.

Sales Workers

These jobs include non-managerial activities that wholly and primarily involve direct sales. Examples of these types of positions include: advertising sales agents; insurance sales agents; real estate brokers and sales agents; wholesale sales representatives; securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents; telemarketers; demonstrators; retail salespersons; counter and rental clerks; and cashiers.

Administrative Support Workers

These jobs involve non-managerial tasks providing administrative and support assistance, primarily in office settings. Examples of these types of positions include: office and administrative support workers; bookkeeping; accounting and auditing clerks; cargo and freight agents; dispatchers; couriers; data entry keyers; computer operators; shipping, receiving and traffic clerks; word processors and typists; proofreaders; desktop publishers; and general office clerks.

Craft Workers (formerly Craft Workers (Skilled))

Most jobs in this category include higher skilled occupations in construction (building trades craft workers and their formal apprentices) and natural resource extraction workers. Examples of these types of positions include: boilermakers; brick and stone masons; carpenters; electricians; painters (both construction and maintenance); glaziers; pipe layers, plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters; plasterers; roofers; elevator installers; earth drillers; derrick operators; oil and gas rotary drill operators; and blasters and explosive workers. This category also includes occupations related to the installation, maintenance and part replacement of equipment, machines and tools, such as: automotive mechanics; aircraft mechanics; and electric and electronic equipment repairers. This category also includes some production occupations that are distinguished by the high degree of skill and precision required to perform them, based on clearly defined task specifications, such as: millwrights; etchers and engravers; tool and die makers; and pattern makers.

Operatives (formerly Operatives (Semi-skilled))

Most jobs in this category include intermediate skilled occupations and include workers who operate machines or factory-related processing equipment. Most of these occupations do not usually require more than several months of training. Examples include: textile machine workers; laundry and dry cleaning workers; photographic process workers; weaving machine operators; electrical and electronic equipment assemblers; semiconductor processors; testers, graders and sorters; bakers; and butchers and other meat, poultry and fish processing workers. This category also includes occupations of generally intermediate skill levels that are concerned with operating and controlling equipment to facilitate the movement of people or materials, such as: bridge and lock tenders; truck, bus or taxi drivers; industrial truck and tractor (forklift) operators; parking lot attendants; sailors; conveyor operators; and hand packers and packagers.

Laborers and Helpers (formerly Laborers (Unskilled))

Jobs in this category include workers with more limited skills who require only brief training to perform tasks that require little or no independent judgment. Examples include: production and construction worker helpers; vehicle and equipment cleaners; laborers; freight, stock and material movers; service station attendants; construction laborers; refuse and recyclable materials collectors; septic tank servicers; and sewer pipe cleaners.

Service Workers

Jobs in this category include food service, cleaning service, personal service, and protective service activities. Skill may be acquired through formal training, job- related training or direct experience. Examples of food service positions include: cooks; bartenders; and other food service workers. Examples of personal service positions include: medical assistants and other healthcare support positions; hairdressers; ushers; and transportation attendants. Examples of cleaning service positions include: cleaners; janitors; and porters. Examples of protective service positions include: transit and railroad police and fire fighters; guards; private detectives and investigators.